Wrapping with Fabric: Your Complete Guide to Furoshiki-The Japanese Art of Wrapping

Wrapping with Fabric: Your Complete Guide to Furoshiki-The Japanese Art of Wrapping

Etsuko Yamada, Kanji Okamoto

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 4805313145

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Wrap anything from a wine bottle to a yoga mat with this practical Japanese fabric-wrapping book.

Long before today's eco-friendly philosophy of "reduce, reuse, recycle" entered America's collective consciousness, furoshiki—the Japanese method of wrapping things with fabric—flourished as a time-honored and practical art form. In Wrapping With Fabric, Etsuko Yamada—born into a long-line of furoshiki makers in Kyoto—explains the "one cloth, many uses" ideology behind the craft, the etiquette of color and the craft's fascinating history. From there, she shares the myriad ways in which a few basic techniques can transform a simple square of cloth into an elegant wrapper.

Use your folded fabrics to:

  • Gift-wrap anything from books to flowers
  • Bundle up a picnic
  • Tote items around
  • Use as a handbag or backpack
  • Make into a pillow covering
  • Create decorative coverings for vases, tissue boxes, and more

A quiet reminder that opportunities for artistry are everywhere around you, Wrapping With Fabric is the craft book that makes it easy to bring a touch of grace and ingenuity to everyday life—and help preserve the environment, too.

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useful as small bags. The sight of someone holding a furoshiki wrapping is truly lovely, but carrying something with both hands is not always the best way to use a furoshiki. By utilizing one of furoshiki’s core principles, which is that “the content is the leading actor,” and making the best bag to suit that content, you can create an easy-to-handle, fashionable and natural bag. Depending on your needs at the time, it can be a shoulder bag, a shopping bag, a handbag, or whatever. There is no

them one more time. 6. Pull them to the back of the pot and tie a ma-musubi knot. This completes the Flower-Pot Wrapping. Flower-Pot Wrapping—about 41in (105cm) cotton square How About One in Your Wardrobe? You can enjoy Japanese style even more easily with a furoshiki than by wearing a kimono. For example, tie a ma-musubi knot behind your neck using two adjacent corners of a furoshiki, and then tie another ma-musubi knot behind your waist using the other two corners, and you have a type of

Huge furoshiki are used to wrap futon bedding. They are stored away in a closet when not in use. Antique dealers at the flea markets transport their goods to the weekly markets in faded furoshiki. Here it is important not to judge the content by its cover. Furoshiki mismatches often make for surprises. A furoshiki wrapped the ashes of the son of our beloved contractor Tazaki-san. We had gone to the interment, and as we were heading for home the elder son met us. He was carrying his brother’s

a furoshiki as a bathing utensil appears in Joyokinmozui, an encyclopedia of manners for ladies in the Edo period. (National Diet Library) Since the “Hirazutsumi” and furoshiki were similar in shape and use, gradually the distinction between them faded away, and by the middle of the Edo period people were commonly referring to wrapping cloths as furoshiki. Merchants used furoshiki to transport their goods, and travelers used them to wrap and carry their belongings. Over time, however, furoshiki

a furoshiki as a bathing utensil appears in Joyokinmozui, an encyclopedia of manners for ladies in the Edo period. (National Diet Library) Since the “Hirazutsumi” and furoshiki were similar in shape and use, gradually the distinction between them faded away, and by the middle of the Edo period people were commonly referring to wrapping cloths as furoshiki. Merchants used furoshiki to transport their goods, and travelers used them to wrap and carry their belongings. Over time, however, furoshiki

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