The Rough Guide to Beijing

The Rough Guide to Beijing

Simon Lewis

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 1848366566

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Rough Guide to Beijing, in full-color throughout, is the ultimate travel guide to this endlessly absorbing city. Discover the highlights of China's remarkable capital with stunning photography, color-coded maps, and insightful descriptions of the city's sights — from the Forbidden City and Summer Palace to hidden hutong alleys and the Great Wall.

However long you're staying and whatever your budget, The Rough Guide to Beijing has you covered. Comprehensive sections point the way to the very best places to sleep, eat, drink, shop, and unwind; charming courtyard hotels, bustling night markets, edgy bars, and glitzy malls are all part of the mix. In addition, expert new sections on film, contemporary art, and live music will enable you to take the pulse of modern Beijing.

Make the most of your time with The Rough Guide to Beijing.

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your passport before being allowed near a computer. They’re on every back street, but are particularly prevalent close to colleges. There’s never an English sign; look out for the character for “net”, wang – two crosses inside an “n” (see p.192). There’s a handy internet café on the 3rd floor of The Station, the shopping centre on the east side of Qianmen; note that there’s one section for locals at ¥7 per hour, and one for foreigners that charges ¥20 per hour. Another large café is on Diananmen

isn’t impenetrable, it’s simply meant to make getting information deemed controversial enough of a hassle that most Chinese people won’t bother. You can get around it simply by subscribing to a Virtual Private Network, or VPN, such as WiTopia, Hotspot Shield or UltraSurf (just about every foreign business in China does this) all of which cost a few pounds a month and offer a free limited period trial. The Beijing National Library, 39 Baishiqiao Lu (Mon–Fri 8am–5pm; T010/68415566), just north of

least £1000/US$1500/¥1000 a month, which gets you a rough imitation of a Western apartment. Living in ordinary neighbourhoods is much cheaper: a furnished two-bedroom apartment can cost around £250/US$300/¥2500 a month. The easiest way to find an apartment is through a real estate agent, who will usually take a month’s rent as a fee. There are plenty of agents, and many advertise in the expat magazines – an example is Wo Ai Wo Jia (44 Chengfu Lu; T010/62557602, Wwww .5i5j.com). Homestays can be

More imaginative than most tours (visitors are biked about in rickshaws), they are very popular with tour groups. Private drivers are hard to avoid – they’ll pressurize you to go with them. If you do go for this option, be sure to barter; you should pay around ¥60 for an hour, and expect to be taken to a few Courtyard houses NORTH OF THE C E NTRE | Around the Shicha lakes Beijing’s hutongs are lined with siheyuan (㙼⧩㴠, VuKp\XjQ), single-storey courtyard houses that are home to about a fifth

G Drinking and nightlife .............................................. 145 H Entertainment and art.............................................. 149 I Shopping ................................................................. 159 J Sports and fitness ................................................... 167 8 B | eijing hotels were once largely impersonal concerns, with standardized, rather nondescript, modern interiors. But newer accommodation options are placing more emphasis on

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