Robert Mitchum: "Baby I Don't Care"

Robert Mitchum: "Baby I Don't Care"

Lee Server

Language: English

Pages: 608

ISBN: 0312285434

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


One of the movies' greatest actors and most colorful characters, a real-life tough guy with the prison record to prove it, Robert Mitchum was a movie icon for an almost unprecedented half-century, the cool, sleepy-eyed star of such classics as The Night of the Hunter; Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison; Cape Fear; The Longest Day; Farewell, My Lovely; and The Winds of War. Mitchum's powerful presence and simmering violence combined with hard-boiled humor and existential detachment to create a new style in movie acting: the screen's first hipster antihero-before Brando, James Dean, Elvis, or Eastwood-the inventor of big-screen cool.

Robert Mitchum: "Baby, I Don't Care" is the first complete biography of Mitchum, and a book as big, colorful, and controversial as the star himself. Exhaustively researched, it makes use of thousands of rare documents from around the world and nearly two hundred in-depth interviews with Mitchum's family, friends, and associates (many going on record for the first time ever) ranging over his seventy-nine years of hard living. Written with great style, and vividly detailed, this is an intimate, comprehensive portrait of an amazing life, comic, tragic, daring, and outrageous.

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ROBERT MITCHUM Also by Lee Server Screenwriter: Words Become Pictures (1987) Danger Is My Business: An Illustrated History of the Fabulous Pulp Magazines: 1896-1953 (1993) Sam Fuller: Film Is a Battleground (1994) Over My Dead Body. The Sensational Age of the American Paperback: 1945-1955 (1994) Asian Pop Cinema: Bombay to Tokyo (1999) •   •   • As Editor The Big Book of Noir (with Ed Gorman and Martin H. Greenberg) (1998) ROBERT MITCHUM “Baby, I Dont’ Care” LEE SERVER St. Martin’s

corruption and criminal domination of a big American city. Hughes’s update anticipated what would become the dominant thematic trend in the gangster genre in the next decade, the view of crime as another form of efficient big business with corporate rules of behavior and no room for hotheaded mob bosses determined to take things “personal.” The Racket would also anticipate the fascist cop fantasies of the Dirty Harry ‘70s, with its nonjudgmental display of matter-of-fact police brutality and

course, within sight of Mrs. Wayne (that Blood Alley–era feud remained alive). Mitchum was ever amused at the way Duke played his role in life to the hilt, wearing four-inch lifts to make his six-foot-four-inch frame still more impressive—gave him that funny walk, Mitchum said—having his car roof raised so he could comfortably keep his Stetson in place while driving. Once Mitchum came to Wayne’s production office and listened to him screaming at his staff, knocking chairs over in a seemingly

course, within sight of Mrs. Wayne (that Blood Alley–era feud remained alive). Mitchum was ever amused at the way Duke played his role in life to the hilt, wearing four-inch lifts to make his six-foot-four-inch frame still more impressive—gave him that funny walk, Mitchum said—having his car roof raised so he could comfortably keep his Stetson in place while driving. Once Mitchum came to Wayne’s production office and listened to him screaming at his staff, knocking chairs over in a seemingly

interest. Unsure if the agent would ever find him anything, Mitchum tried an end run with a friend from the Players Guild and registered for screen extra work. But even this mundane employment, standing around in crowd scenes, seemed to require an inside track. While he waited for something to happen he took a part-time job selling shoes on the weekend at a shop on Wilshire Boulevard. It was clownish work, on your knees wrestling with strangers’ feet, you were supposed to push the old shoes

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