China in the Global Economy Governance in China

China in the Global Economy Governance in China

OECD

Language: English

Pages: 577

ISBN: 2:00115745

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


While China's economy has shown impressive dynamism following the increased reliance on market-based policies, the governance structures themselves will have to be reformed deeply for this growth to be sustainable. This report examines the many challenges of governance which China is facing.  In addition to the well-known problems related to the lack of openness in government and intellectual property rights, this book also looks at the delivery of public services, management of state assets, regulatory management, e-government, taxation and public expenditure, fighting corruption, and producing reliable information. Selected policy areas where the insufficient governance reforms have an impact on the policies themselves -- like the financial sector, agriculture, environmental protection, labour market and social protection, education, and competition -- are also discussed.

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ISBN 92-64-00842-X – © OECD 2005 7 SYNTHESIS Table of Contents 1. Introduction: the China Governance Project and the Chinese context . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1. The China Governance Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2. China’s governance in transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3. Governance matters to ensure China’s sustainable development . . . . . . . . . . . 11 11 12 17 2.

partnerships Regulation Quasi-governmental organisations PSUs Functions Arm’s-length government: public ownership of public service organisations 3. Government private law bodies 4. Public law administrations 5. Departmental agencies of ministries Ministries There is no universally accepted classification of arm’s-length bodies. They differ widely in terms of organisation, legal status, and degree of management autonomy or political independence (see Table 2.1). But basically governments have

Loopholes or provisions that may present potential for misuse can be observed as well. For example, while China’s legislation sanctions the non-respect of accounting procedures by state-owned companies and joint ventures, there are no provisions clearly prohibiting company management from placing relatives in charge of book-keeping and financial disbursement. As managerial autonomy has extended to most personal appointments, the practice seems to have become common since the 1990s. Therefore,

investment from the private sector. However, local operations, especially those using private funds, tend to produce network redundancy and incompatible platforms. Therefore, the consensus since the SCILG conference of 2002 is that more co-ordination and supervision are needed to ensure structural optimization and maximum cost efficiency. Even with this consensus, the budgetary system remains insufficiently structured, lacking formal rules or clear guidelines. In general, it allows for different

In addition to online services targeting Internet users, e-government may also bring about back-office changes that can improve services to those without Internet access who contact the government through more traditional channels. For instance, local governments in China are experimenting with innovative ways to blend online e-government applications with such traditional media as the telephone. The Haishu District Government of Ningbo City, Zhejiang Province, established the 81 890 Community

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