Capone: A Photographic Portrait of America's Most Notorious Gangster

Capone: A Photographic Portrait of America's Most Notorious Gangster

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 157284146X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Capone is a visual retelling of the rise and eventual fall of Chicago's most notorious gangster: Alphonse “Scarface” Capone. Comprised of many previously unreleased photographs from the Chicago Tribune's vast archives, Capone reveals the Roaring Twenties and the early days of organized crime. Taken from 1926 to 1952, these photos focus on Capone and his extended network of family, friends, and enemies. All the photos — high-quality scans of original glass-plate negatives — are historically significant for both those interested in Capone and photography buffs in general. The first section covers Al Capone's luxurious and illicit gangster lifestyle, including vacation homes, mob funerals, and gun-toting arrests up to and including the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre of 1929. Part two documents Capone's 1931 arrest, trial, and sentencing on charges of defrauding the government. The third section introduces a mob target who evaded assassination for decades, and another who wasn't so lucky. Part four follows up with Al Capone's brother, Ralph, and the final section focuses on Capone's death.

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Lombardo, Capone’s adviser, was gunned down six days earlier at the intersection of Madison and Dearborn Streets in Chicago. (Purpose of arrows unknown.) 1929: Capone in a bathing suit at his vacation home in Miami. Capone’s vacation retreat provided an alibi for his whereabouts during the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre in Chicago. This photo was retouched prior to publication. Because presses at that time couldn’t reproduce photographic images well, retouching was used to add definition to

death, including reports that it was connected with Al Capone’s imminent release from prison and that the gang boss wanted control back. Another theory was that the mob suspected O’Hare of having “stooled” to the federal government on tax and other matters. Nov. 10, 1939: The body of Edward J. O’Hare being removed from the funeral parlor. The nattily dressed Edward Spike O’Donnell, who survived more than a dozen assassination attempts, was an outspoken Capone rival and beer runner during

denotes material created to connect the various source materials into a coherent whole. Introduction The images of Al Capone in this book were digitized from glass-plate negatives and original prints made from glass plates. These plates had been stored for decades in the deepest of basement storage rooms at the Tribune Tower, five levels below Michigan Avenue street level. Protected in paper envelopes, the plates were filed haphazardly. They were only recently located and brought up to

historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo/Herald&Examiner, 1931 Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo Chicago Tribune historical photo/Herald&Examiner, October 13, 1931 Chicago Tribune historical

glass plates associated with those prints have not been found, but the prints were so interesting and high quality that we included them in this collection. During Capone’s lifetime, photographic techniques evolved from glass plates to 4-by-5 black-and-white film negatives. By the time Capone died in 1947, all of the photo coverage of his funeral was recorded on film. The images were taken by photographers of the Chicago Tribune as well as the now-defunct Chicago Herald-Examiner and Chicago

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